Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Fast internet: necessity for business, mere privilege for consumers

Perhaps the whole discussion about bandwidth availability should be clarified and made more specific: i.e. more bandwidth for business and, say, just "enough" (state a number in MB/s) for consumers.

That again boils down to the difference between adults and juveniles. The adults (on a macro-level business) are bringing home the bacon and therefore are entitled to the tools (such as high-speed internet, for example). Juveniles (on a macro-level consumers) merely consume and therefore should see said tools (which they most likely will use as toys) more as priviliges access to which should be closely supervised and controlled.

This one from commentor "migs42" is interesting input into this "debate":
I’m going to read Twilight for an hour and I’m going to browse the BBC website for an hour. Internet wins in this scenario, hands down.
So does this mean Internet is better? Let’s look again.
Reading Adam Smith’s ‘Wealth of Nations’ for an hour and browsing LOLcatz for an hour. So, LOLcatz is more educating than Adam Smith’s book then? You see what I mean.

Here are some of the guiding questions at work when we compare (1) low-bandwidth info channels (like books and other reading materials) and (2) high-bandwidth ones (like the Net, TV, radio, even picture books and glossy magazines can be considered high-bandwidth channels compared to primarily text-based books):

(i) Which one of the two has the highest ratio of ambient noise and distraction -- i.e. extraneous information that does not add value to the primary information content being delivered by said channel.

(ii) Which one of the two encourages and trains a person in superior forms of information gathering and builds better comprehension skills. Reading books for example requires more focus and concentration while browsing the Net exacts very little demands on a person's mental faculties, and therefore excessive time spent on the Net could potentially be a cause of an atrophy in concentration and reading comprehension skills in the poor bozos who are left to their devices in front of a computer.

Note item (ii). Perhaps this is the reason why we are seeing this dumb-and-dumber trend in today's "Generation Y" -- which goes a long way towards explaining the moronic behaviour of smartphone-armed dumbos like Carmen "Mai" Mislang.

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